USING WHETHER or IF

The formal rule is to use IF when you have a conditional sentence and WHETHER when you are showing that two alternatives are possible. Some examples will make this more clear. ex: “The President didn’t know WHETHER the zombie attack would begin on Monday or Tuesday.” Because I used “whether,” Read more…

ALL ABOUT the AMPERSAND

The origin of the ampersand can be traced back to the Latin word “et,” meaning “and.” The E and the T that make up this word were occasionally written together to form a ligature (a character consisting of two or more joined letters). Writing the word this way saved the Read more…

APRIL FOOLS’ DAY or APRIL FOOL’S DAY?

The official name for the April 1 holiday in the United States is April Fools’ Day. “Fools” is plural because (presumably), there’s more than one fool; thus, the apostrophe comes after the “s” because of plural possession. Both The American Heritage Dictionary and Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary list the name as “April Fools’ Day.” April Read more…

ALL ABOUT the GRAWLIX

From ThoughtCo:  The term GRAWLIX refers to the series of typographical symbols (such as @#$%&!) used in cartoons and comic strips to represent swear words. The plural is “grawlixes.” Also known as “jarns,” “nittles,” and “obscenicons,” grawlixes usually appear in maledicta balloons alongside the comic characters who are uttering the Read more…

THE AMPERSAND

The origin of the ampersand can be traced back to the Latin word “et,” meaning “and.” The E and the T that make up this word were occasionally written together to form a ligature (a character consisting of two or more joined letters). Writing the word this way saved the Read more…

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